Introduction Situated between Florence and Siena there is a third city, known as Chianti. This third city is formed of castles, fortress, towers, farms, Romanesque churches, rectories and chapels. The vineyards in this picturesque part of Tuscany produce the grapes used in namesake Chianti and Chianti Classico: world-famous reds sold under the Gallo Nero (Black Cockerel/Rooster) trademark. It’s a landscape where you’ll encounter historic olive groves, honey-coloured stone farmhouses, dense forests, graceful Romanesque pievi (rural churches), handsome Renaissance villas and imposing stone castles built in the Middle Ages by Florentine and Sienese

There is no doubt that Florence is one of the most amazing cities in Italy, probably in the world, thanks to its rich cultural history. Talented artists and architects have lived and worked in Florence over the centuries: Giotto, Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raffaello, and many more. Here, they left their print, which everyone can still see and appreciate, such as beautiful monuments, churches, palaces, and works of art. If you think how extraordinary all of this is, you will be thrilled to know that Florence can unveil other pleasant surprises. It

Chianti wine is one of the most popular Italian wines, especially in the US. You may have heard about it, or even tasted it. Maybe, you bought a fancy fiasco bottle of Chianti in a store once, to make a good impression with friends or relatives. Or maybe, you don’t know anything about this wine at all. Whether you are a wine lover or a wine probie, one thing is for sure, a Chianti wine tasting in a real Chianti cellar is an experience worth doing at least once in

Chianti Classico Chianti Classico is located in an area between Florence and Siena and probably is the most common Tuscany wine knowed in the world wide. The famous of this area begin 300 years ago (1716) about when Cosimo III de Medici decided to define the border of the area and assign the actually name of Chianti Classino. In that time, Chianti was made just 100% Sangiovese. Later, in 1837, Baron Ricasoli difenid new rules in the area and assigne the possibility to mix 70% Sangiovese with 15% Cannaiolo (indigenous